Course Outline

GOVT 320 : American National Government

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Last approved: Mon, 11 Jan 2016 19:42:20 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 11 Jan 2016 19:42:19 GMT

GOVT 320-WW
Campus
Worldwide
College of Arts & Sciences (WARSC)
GOVT
320
American National Government
3
This course covers basic issues of American democracy, constitutional principles, and the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

The course design aids the student in developing an understanding of the political world in which he or she lives. The student assesses the political "rules of the game," institutions, actors, and concepts to develop a holistic picture of who gets what and how in political conflict and come to a realization of his or her place in the process, regardless of the personal level of involvement in politics.

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

1. Identify, define, and discuss events, terms, and concepts in the American governmental system, including Federal, State (including the resident state where taught) and Local governments, as indicated by closed book quizzes, class discussion, term paper completion, and examinations.

2. Analyze and describe the fundamental differences between the US democratic system, other democracies, and other type of governments as indicated by examinations and class discussions.

3. Assess the effectiveness of public opinion, the mass media, and political actors in their ability to affect political outcomes, using historically significant events and information from current headlines.

4. Demonstrate an ability to work with other students and be analyzing political information in a group setting by using evidence, analytical reasoning, and effective team-building protocols and presenting.

5. Express ideas in an organized, coherent, written form with references and citations of credible sources from academic databases accessed through the ERAU Hunt Library, online databases, and research tools. databases, and research tools.

Located on the Daytona Beach Campus, the Jack R. Hunt Library is the primary library for all students of the Worldwide Campus. The Chief Academic Officer strongly recommends that every faculty member, where appropriate, require all students in his or her classes to access the Hunt Library or a comparable college-level local library for research. The results of this research can be used for class projects such as research papers, group discussion, or individual presentations. Students should feel comfortable with using the resources of the library. 


Web & Chat: http://huntlibrary.erau.edu
Email:  library@erau.edu
Text: (386) 968-8843
Library Phone:  (386) 226-7656 or (800) 678-9428
Hourshttp://huntlibrary.erau.edu/about/hours.html
 

1. Resident State Constitution where taught, for example, Nevada State Constitution and Amendments: http://www/leg/state.nv.us/Const/NVConst.html 2. For Nevada campuses and courses only: Bowers, M.W. The Sagebrush State, 3rd Ed.: Nevada’s History, Government, and Politics, University of Nevada Press (ISBN: 978-0-87417-682-7) NOTE: Specific State Constitutions are not addressed in the OnLine version of the course, because the students are residents of several states and territories, as well as several other countries. Recommended: American Psychological Association. (2011). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, D.C.: Author. ISBN: 10: 1-4338-0561-8.
N/A

Written assignments must be formatted in accordance with the current edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) unless otherwise instructed in individual assignments.

ActivityPercent of Grade
Input Grading Item100

Undergraduate Grade Scale

90 - 100% A
80 - 89% B
70 - 79% C
60 - 69% D
0 - 60% F

Graduate Grade Scale

90 - 100% A
80 - 89% B
70 - 79% C
0 - 69% F
Written and oral communications, aviation applications of subject matter, and computer skills are emphasized in each course offered throughout the Worldwide Campus. Use of APA format in writing recommended.
TOPIC I: Constitutional Principles 1. Constitutional Democracy 2. Constitutional Foundations - The Constitution of the United States 3. American Federalism. 4A. The resident State Constitution, for example: If taught in Nevada, cover the Nevada State Constitution (If required by State Licensing authorities) Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs): The student will be able to: 1. Identify, define, and discuss events, terms, and concepts in the American governmental system, including Federal, State (including resident state where taught) and Local governments, as indicated by quizzes, class discussion, term paper completion, and examinations; (PO-3, PO-4, PO-12, PO-13, PO-14) 2. Analyze and describe the fundamental differences between the US democratic system, other democracies, and other type of governments as indicated by examinations and class discussions; (PO-12, PO-13) TOPIC II: The Political Process 4. The Political Culture & Ideology 5. American Political Landscape 6. Interest Groups 7. Political Parties 8. Public Opinion, Participation, and Voting 9. Campaigns & Elections 10. The Media and U.S. Politics Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs): The student will be able to: 3. Using historically significant events and information from current headlines, assess the effectiveness of public opinion, the mass media, and political actors in their ability to affect political outcomes. (PO-3, PO-4, PO-12, PO-13, PO-14) 4. Demonstrate an ability to work with other students and by analyzing political information in a group setting by using evidence, analytical reasoning, and effective team-building protocols and presenting. (PO-9, PO-13, PO-14) 5. Express ideas in an organized, coherent, written form with references and citations of credible sources from academic databases accessed through the ERAU Hunt Library, online databases, and research tools. (PO-3, PO-7, PO-14) TOPIC III: Policy-Making Institutions of the U.S. Government 11. The Congress 12. The Presidency 13. The Federal Bureaucracy 14. The Judiciary Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs): The student will be able to: 1. Identify, define, and discuss events, terms, and concepts in the American governmental system, including Federal, State (including resident state where taught) and Local governments, as indicated by quizzes, class discussions, term paper completion, and examinations; (PO-3, PO-4, PO-12, PO-13, PO-14) 2. Analyze and describe the fundamental differences between the US democratic system, other democracies, and other types of governments as indicated by examinations and class discussions; (PO-12, PO-13) TOPIC IV: Rights and Liberties 15. Civil Liberties 16. Civil Rights Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs): The student will be able to: 1. Identify, define, and discuss events, terms, and concepts in the American governmental system, including Federal, State (including resident state where taught) and Local governments, as indicated by quizzes, class discussion, term paper completion, and examinations; (PO-3, PO-4, PO-12, PO-13, PO-14) 2. Analyze and describe the fundamental differences between the US democratic system, other democracies, and other types of governments as indicated by examinations and class discussions; (PO-12, PO-13) TOPIC V: The Politics of National Policy 17. The Policy Process 18. Making Economic Policy 19. Making Social Policy 20. Making Foreign and Defense Policy Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs): The student will be able to: 1. Identify, define, and discuss events, terms, and concepts in the American governmental system, including Federal, State (including resident State where taught) and Local governments, as indicated by quizzes, class discussion, term paper completion, and examinations; (PO-3, PO-4, PO-12, PO-13, PO-14) 2. Analyze and describe the fundamental differences between the US democratic system, other democracies, and other type of governments as indicated by examinations and class discussions; (PO-12, PO-13) 3. Using historically significant events and information from current headlines, assess the effectiveness of public opinion, the mass media, and political actors in their ability to affect political outcomes. (PO-3, PO-4, PO-12, PO-13, PO-14) 4. Demonstrate an ability to work with other students and by analyzing political information in a group setting by using evidence, analytical reasoning, and effective team-building protocols and presenting. (PO-9, PO-13, PO-14) 5. Express ideas in an organized, coherent, written form with references and citations of credible sources from academic databases accessed through the ERAU Hunt Library, online databases, and research tools. (PO-3, PO-7, PO-14) Research Paper Students will prepare an eight-to-ten page research paper in a modified APA format, with an Abstract, Body, Citations, and Reference List, on a topic from the list below. All topics must be pre-approved by the faculty by Week 2 of the course. A bibliography must be submitted by the end of the Week 4 of either the Grounded or the Online versions of the course and the outline by end of Week 6 (Grounded or Online). The final research paper must be submitted by the end of Week 9. Failure to meet these interim and final deadlines may result in a lowered paper grade. The research paper must include at least three sources in addition to your textbook. At least one of those sources must be a scholarly article obtained from the databases in the Embry-Riddle Hunt Library online. You access the Library Databases through the Online Services tab at the top of the course page (Online) or directly from the Library (library@erau.edu) (Grounded). Several online databases can be used to find articles for this course: EBSCO Journals, Education Resources Information Center (ERIC) Database, Emerald Full text, OmniFile, and ProQuest. Moreover, the paper must have appropriate citations according to the ERAU Student Guide for Term Papers (see Course Specific Resources folder to download this guide). If you have any questions about your citation method, please ask the instructor. Note: All papers submitted for grading in this course may be submitted to SafeAssignment for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. Use the Assignment links to submit your research paper topic in Week 2 (Online) or email to your instructor as an attachment (Grounded), your research paper bibliography in Week 4 (Online or Grounded) , your research paper outline in Week 6 (Online or Grounded) and your final paper in Week 9 (Online or Grounded). Suggested Research Paper Topic List: 1. Why is Marbury v. Madison a landmark Supreme Court decision? 2. How did the power of the federal government expand after 9/11? Give one example of federal government power expansion after 9/11 and follow it from its origination to today. 3. Define Putnam’s concept of “social capital.” How does it relate to the events of 9/11? 4. Define the Great Debate: Centralists Versus Decentralists as a theory of government. Give examples of how it affects the political arguments of the recent (2014) election cycle. 5. What were the causes and significance of California’s Proposition 209? 6. How did President George W. Bush’s performance after 9/11 illustrate both the powers of and constraints upon the modern presidency? 7. What was the purpose of the Hatch Act? How has it been revised? 8. The Due Process Clause of the 14th Amendment states that “No State shall…deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law….” How is this clause relevant to Gitlow v. New York and what was that case’s ultimate impact? 9. What political pressure can young workers exert to make sure fixing Social Security is fair to workers and beneficiaries alike? 10. Why do liberals and women seem to favor diplomacy over military power? This assignment will comprise 20 percent of your course grade. This assignment is only to be submitted once for credit. There is not an option for revising this assignment and resubmitting it for a higher grade.
Aaron S. Springer, J.D., LL.M - 3/31/2015
Sprin472@erau.edu
Tommy Walter, Ed.D. - 3/31/2015
Tommy.walter@erau.edu
Alan R. Bender, Ph.D. - 3/31/2015
Alan.bender@erau.edu
Dr. James Schultz – 3/31/2015
schul9fd@erau.edu
PO#NameDescription
1-14 General Education PO1 - Apply knowledge of college level mathematics to defining and solving problems;
PO2 - Apply statistical methods in the analysis and interpretation of data for the purpose of drawing valid conclusions relating to the solutions of problems;
PO3 - Communicate ideas in written form in both technical and non-technical areas;
PO4 - Communicate ideas in non-written form, such as through oral presentations or visual media;
PO5 - Recognize the importance of professional, ethical and social responsibility;
PO6 - Understand the natural world, to include the impact of the environment on aerospace operations and aerospace operations on the environment, as well as everyday life and professional experiences;
PO7 - Use digitally-enabled technology to organize and manipulate data, perform calculations, aid in solving problems, and communicate solutions, ideas, and concepts;
PO8 - Use scientific information in critical thinking and decision-making processes;
PO9 - Function on multi-cultural and/or multi-disciplinary teams;
PO10 - Apply economic principles to identify, formulate, and solve problems within professional and personal environments;
PO11 - Identify and participate in professional and personal development activities through organizations and self-directed learning;
PO12 - Understand contemporary issues in society
PO13 - Recognize the complexity and diversity of the human experience, including cultural, aesthetic, psychological, philosophical, and spiritual dimensions;
PO14 - Conduct and report research in accordance with professional standards.
Key: 105