Course Outline

ASCI 606 : Air Traffic Control and the National Airspace System

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Last approved: Mon, 11 Jan 2016 17:18:36 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 11 Jan 2016 17:18:35 GMT

ASCI 606-WW
Campus
Worldwide
College of Aeronautics (WAERO)
ASCI
606
Air Traffic Control and the National Airspace System
3
This course provides a detailed analysis of current and future developments and trends in Air Traffic Control (ATC), Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the National Airspace System (NAS). NAS topics addressed include the evolution of current national policies, plans, and objectives that will ensure the safe and efficient transformation to the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The most recent planned improvements for each major component of ATC systems are examined individually and as part of the system as a whole.

The course is designed to provide the student an understanding of the development of the FAA from the beginning of aviation in this country to the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). It examines the intricate procedures used in the current ATC system, its history, navigation and phraseology. The student will look at the organizational structure, purpose and capacity. Students will also study the economic, social and political influences that create the dynamics of the NAS, as well as the human factors and processes of control that ensure a sufficient, trained workforce and growth in the NAS. Upon completion of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of the terminology, concepts and vocabulary of ATC, the NAS, FAA and NextGen to include; the implementation of new and existing technologies, reconfigured facilities and enhanced runways that take full advantage of NextGen’s benefits, while sustaining the current system during the transition.

Upon course completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Analyze the major elements in the U.S. National Airspace System, the U. S. Air Traffic Control (ATC) system and other nations ATC systems, for comparison in effectiveness.

2. Analyze the most important major legislation and the historic events in aviation that have influenced the evolution of the U.S. ATC system to understand the relationship between historic events and legislative procedures.

3. Evaluate the FAA’s Capitol Investment Plan that shows the sustainability of the existing National Air Space program for the next five years while transitioning to the Next Generation Air Transportation System.

4. Analyze and evaluate the FAA’s organizational structure, responsibilities and resources in ATC that determine the location, number and type of facility.

5. Analyze the economic, social and political influences that create the dynamics of the NAS, as well as the human factors and processes of ATC that ensure a sufficient, trained workforce in the NAS.

6. Evaluate the current ATC, FAA, and NAS communications, navigation, and surveillance systems with respect to future user demands that will ensure the safe and efficient transformation to the planned improvements for each major component of ATC.

7. Analyze NextGen’s, advanced navigation systems impact on the transportation industry that will require reconfigured facilities and enhanced runways to take full advantage of NextGen’s benefits.

8. Evaluate the present and future impact of “free flight” and security in the future of the NAS to understand the relationship between the controllers, the airspace and the airlines.

9. Critically analyze the current major components of ATC system in the United States against the forecasted changes to the system, recommend procedures for implementation or operational changes to ensure continued safety in the ATC and NAS.

10. Demonstrate an ability to locate, retrieve, and assess air traffic control and national airspace system reference materials from the Hunt Memorial Library Electronic databases, as the information retrieval portion of your increase in computing, critical thinking, decision-making, information retrieval, speaking and writing skills in this course, as mutually agreed upon by the student and instructor.

Upon course completion, students will be able to:

11. Demonstrate appropriate selection and application of a research method and statistical analysis (where required), specific to the course subject matter (effective July 1, 2013).

Located on the Daytona Beach Campus, the Jack R. Hunt Library is the primary library for all students of the Worldwide Campus. The Chief Academic Officer strongly recommends that every faculty member, where appropriate, require all students in his or her classes to access the Hunt Library or a comparable college-level local library for research. The results of this research can be used for class projects such as research papers, group discussion, or individual presentations. Students should feel comfortable with using the resources of the library. 


Web & Chat: http://huntlibrary.erau.edu
Email:  library@erau.edu
Text: (386) 968-8843
Library Phone:  (386) 226-7656 or (800) 678-9428
Hourshttp://huntlibrary.erau.edu/about/hours.html
 

N/A
N/A

Written assignments must be formatted in accordance with the current edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) unless otherwise instructed in individual assignments.

ActivityPercent of Grade
Input Grading Item100

Undergraduate Grade Scale

90 - 100% A
80 - 89% B
70 - 79% C
60 - 69% D
0 - 60% F

Graduate Grade Scale

90 - 100% A
80 - 89% B
70 - 79% C
0 - 69% F
Linda V. Weiland - 3/1/2015
Weila8f3@erau.edu
Dr. Kent Anderson - 3/1/2015
ander5dc@erau.edu
Dr. Ian McAndrew - 3/1/2015
mcand3f1@erau.edu
Dr. Kenneth Witcher - 3/1/2015
kenneth.witcher@erau.edu
Key: 151