Course Outline

ASCI 638 : Human Factors in Unmanned Aerospace Systems

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Last approved: Mon, 11 Jan 2016 17:21:03 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 11 Jan 2016 17:21:02 GMT

ASCI 638-WW
Campus
Worldwide
College of Aeronautics (WAERO)
ASCI
638
Human Factors in Unmanned Aerospace Systems
3
This course is designed to present an overview of the importance of major human factors issues associated with unmanned systems, including remotely operated and autonomous unmanned aerial systems (UAS) and unmanned space systems operations across a variety of platforms employed in both commercial and military operations. Emphasis will be placed on the differences and commonalities between occupied and unoccupied systems, with a focus on the human factor issues encountered by individual unmanned operators (pilots and sensor operators) as well as UAS teams. Students will become familiar with human factor issues surrounding unmanned launch, recovery, long duration operations, fatigue, human performance, Ground Control Station (GCS) design, use of automation, Situation Awareness (SA), Crew Resource Management (CRM), integration into the National Air Space (NAS), attitudes and perspectives of both government agencies and public entities, use of technology to compensate for no-pilot-onboard, and regulatory issues and solutions. Discussions of human capabilities and limitations as it relates to safe and effective operation of unmanned aircraft and space systems in a variety of commercial and military operations will be included.

The course is designed to provide the student with a human factors overview of unmanned aircraft and spacecraft systems, their history and development, uses (both commercial and military), the differences between manned and unmanned vehicles, and discussions revolving around the overarching human factors issues surrounding unmanned aircraft and space; including design, use, and implementation in commercial and military applications.

Upon course completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Describe the history and evolution of unmanned aircraft and space systems as they apply to current and future uses in today’s commercial and military environments.

2. Analyze the commonalities and differences between manned and unmanned systems, and their different uses, applications, and associated human factors.

3. Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of unmanned systems in relation to their current and future intended uses as they relate to human factors.

4. Identify and describe the major human factors issues surrounding the design, use, and implementation of unmanned systems in today’s commercial and military environments.

5. Evaluate the commonalities and differences of human factors issues surrounding the design, use, and implementation of unmanned systems as they are compared to the manned systems.

6. Analyze the sense and avoid issues surrounding the integration of UAS into the National Air Space (NAS).

7. Describe the commonalities and differences in training issues for unmanned operators and crews in terms of Crew Resource Management (CRM) programs.

8. Describe the issues surrounding crews of operators involved in long duration UAS operations (fatigue, handoffs, SA, CRM, etc.).

9. Identify and apply appropriate research methodologies and data analysis for graduate level problems related to course subject matter (effective 1 July 2013).

10. Demonstrate appropriate selection and application of a research methodology and statistical analysis (where required), specific to the course subject matter (effective 1 July 2013).

Located on the Daytona Beach Campus, the Jack R. Hunt Library is the primary library for all students of the Worldwide Campus. The Chief Academic Officer strongly recommends that every faculty member, where appropriate, require all students in his or her classes to access the Hunt Library or a comparable college-level local library for research. The results of this research can be used for class projects such as research papers, group discussion, or individual presentations. Students should feel comfortable with using the resources of the library. 


Web & Chat: http://huntlibrary.erau.edu
Email:  library@erau.edu
Text: (386) 968-8843
Library Phone:  (386) 226-7656 or (800) 678-9428
Hourshttp://huntlibrary.erau.edu/about/hours.html
 

N/A
N/A

Written assignments must be formatted in accordance with the current edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) unless otherwise instructed in individual assignments.

ActivityPercent of Grade
Input Grading Item 100

Undergraduate Grade Scale

90 - 100% A
80 - 89% B
70 - 79% C
60 - 69% D
0 - 60% F

Graduate Grade Scale

90 - 100% A
80 - 89% B
70 - 79% C
0 - 69% F
Timothy Houston - 3/1/2015
timothy.houston@erau.edu
Dr. Brent Terwilliger - 3/1/2015
terwillb@erau.edu
Dr. Ian McAndrew - 3/1/2015
mcand4f1@erau.edu
Dr. Kenneth Witcher - 3/1/2015
kenneth.witcher@erau.edu
Key: 165