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SFTY 570 : Fire Safety Management

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Last approved: Mon, 11 Jan 2016 17:39:25 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 11 Jan 2016 17:39:24 GMT

SFTY 570-WW
Campus
Worldwide
College of Aeronautics (WAERO)
SFTY
570
Fire Safety Management
3
This course is designed to teach the essentials of fire protection in the context of safety, health and environmental management. The course will provide an introduction to fire behavior and combustion to include fire chemistry, fire dynamics and concepts related to the development and spread of fire. The course will also address fire prevention methods, fire detection systems and fire protection including control systems, fire suppression and extinguishment. Lastly, the development of fire safety programs will be addressed, along with emergency action plans and response.

This course is designed to give the graduate student the knowledge, skills and abilities to effectively protect people, property and organizational operations from fire and explosions.

Upon course completion, students will be able to:

1. Formulate and support an argument that fire prevention and fire protection are essential components of the safety, health and environmental professional’s job role.

2. Formulate plans to control fires by addressing the components of the fire tetrahedron.

3. Assess the level of risk associated with common and special fire and explosion hazards within industrial work organizations.

4. Evaluate facilities and operations to determine appropriate fire prevention and protection measures to prevent, control or extinguish industrial fires.

5. Formulate and write fire safety and emergency response programs.

6. Contrast and compare the various types of fire extinguishing agents used to extinguish fires.7. Properly select and distribute fire extinguishers based upon anticipated fire type and degree of hazard.

8. Formulate control strategies and programs to prevent fires and explosions within industrial work environments.

9. Suggest appropriate processes, programs and strategies to ensure effective emergency egress.

10. Apply life safety codes and standards to protect persons and property in the event of a fire.

11. Demonstrate appropriate selection and application of a research method and statistical analysis (where required), specific to the course subject matter (effective July 1,2013).

Located on the Daytona Beach Campus, the Jack R. Hunt Library is the primary library for all students of the Worldwide Campus. The Chief Academic Officer strongly recommends that every faculty member, where appropriate, require all students in his or her classes to access the Hunt Library or a comparable college-level local library for research. The results of this research can be used for class projects such as research papers, group discussion, or individual presentations. Students should feel comfortable with using the resources of the library. 


Web & Chat: http://huntlibrary.erau.edu
Email:  library@erau.edu
Text: (386) 968-8843
Library Phone:  (386) 226-7656 or (800) 678-9428
Hourshttp://huntlibrary.erau.edu/about/hours.html
 

N/A
N/A

Written assignments must be formatted in accordance with the current edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) unless otherwise instructed in individual assignments.

ActivityPercent of Grade
Input Grading Item100

Undergraduate Grade Scale

90 - 100% A
80 - 89% B
70 - 79% C
60 - 69% D
0 - 60% F

Graduate Grade Scale

90 - 100% A
80 - 89% B
70 - 79% C
0 - 69% F
Written and oral communication, as well as computer skills are emphasized in each course offered throughout the Worldwide Campus.
Topic 1. Introduction to Fire Protection Est. Hrs. 4 Student Outcomes: The student will be able to: 1. Contrast the differences between fire prevention and fire protection; 2. Delineate the reasons fire protection engineering has evolved since the early 1900’s; 3. Justify the need for fire prevention and fire protection based upon historical events and outcomes; and 4. Formulate and support an argument that fire prevention and fire protection are essential components of the safety, health, and environmental professional’s job role. Topic 2. Chemistry and Physics of Fire Est. Hrs. 4 Student Outcomes: The student will be able to: 1. Describe the chemistry of fire to include the four components of the fire tetrahedron; 2. Explain how fires can be prevented, controlled, and extinguished through addressing the components of the fire tetrahedron; 3. Assess whether recommended fire prevention and protection measures are appropriate means to prevent, control, or extinguish industrial fires based upon fire chemistry and physics principles; and 4. Recommend and justify housekeeping strategies to prevent and control fires. Topic 3. Fire Program Management, Risk Assessment & Emergency Response Est. Hrs. 4 Student Outcomes: The student will be able to: 1. Select and interpret regulations and standards applicable to fire safety and emergency response; 2. Conduct a fire risk assessment within an organization’s facility and operations; and 3. Formulate and write fire safety and emergency response programs. Topic 4. Industrial Fire Hazards Est. Hrs. 5 Student Outcomes: The student will be able to: 1. Describe common and special fire and explosion hazards within industrial work organizations; 2. Assess the level of risk associated with common and special hazards within industrial work organizations; and 3. Formulate control strategies and programs to prevent fires and explosions within industrial work environments. Topic 5. Hazardous Processes Est. Hrs. 5 Student Outcomes: The student will be able to: 1. Describe fire and explosion hazards associated with combustible dust, reactive hazards, pressure vessels, cylinders, confined space operations, and hazardous processes; 2. Formulate control strategies and programs to prevent fires and explosions within industrial work environments; and 3. Inspect industrial facilities to identify fire and explosion hazards and uncontrolled hazardous processes. Topic 6. Building Construction & Life Safety Est. Hrs. 5 Student Outcomes: The student will be able to: 1. Explain factors that affect the structural integrity of buildings when exposed to fire; 2. Analyze fire hazard probability and severity associated with the various forms of building construction; 3. Recommend building construction that can withstand fire hazards likely to arise out of activities conducted within the building or facility; 4. Explain how psychological factors and personal factors influence the life safety of persons exposed to fire; 5. Suggest appropriate processes, programs, and strategies to ensure effective emergency egress; and 6. Apply life safety codes and standards to protect persons and property in the event of a fire. Topic 7 Fire Alarm Systems Est. Hrs. 5 Student Outcomes: The student will be able to: 1. Describe the functions of an alarm system; 2. Explain factors the safety and health professional should consider when selecting an alarm system; 3. Recommend alarm system components, including initiating devices, notification devices and reporting systems based upon organizational operations, personnel, facilities, environmental factors; and 4. Establish a program that maintains alarm system inspection, testing, and maintenance records. Topic 8. Fire Extinguishment Est. Hrs. 5 Student Outcomes: The student will be able to: 1. Compare and contrast the various types of fire extinguishing agents used to extinguish fires; 2. Properly select and distribute fire extinguishers based upon anticipated fire type and degree of hazard; and 3. Recommend an appropriate sprinkler system type based upon building construction type, operations performed, materials used, and other worksite specific information. Topic 9. Social Behavioral Aspects of Fire Protection Est. Hrs. 3 Student Outcomes: The student will be able to: 1. Describe how people react in fire or emergency situations; 2. Incorporate social and behavioral aspects into fire safety programs and evacuation plans; and 3. Formulate a plan to ensure that workers quickly respond to fires and safely evacuate facilities.
Dr. Todd Smith - 3/1/2015
todd.smith2@erau.edu
Dr. Katherine Moran - 3/1/2015
morank@erau.edu
Dr. Ian McAndrew - 3/1/2015
mcand4f1@erau.edu
Dr. Kenneth Witcher - 3/1/2015
kenneth.witcher@erau.edu
PO#NameDescription
1-6 Master of Science in Occupational Safety Management Upon successful completion of the Master of Science in Occupational Safety Management program, graduates will be able to:

PO 1 – Anticipate, recognize, evaluate, prevent and control workplace safety and occupational health hazards within numerous industries to protect people, property, the environment and organizational operations.

PO 2 – Effectively manage the occupational safety and health function within a variety of industries.

PO 3 – Justify occupational safety and health programs, initiatives and control efforts through the use of business and risk management metrics, by maintaining compliance with applicable standards and regulations or through scientific evaluation of outcomes.

PO 4 – Effectively communicate and interact with persons at all levels within an organization and externally about occupational safety, health and environmental management.

PO 5 – Practice and perform in an ethical, moral, responsible, and accountable manner in all aspects, but especially in the practice of safety.

PO 6 – Identify an occupational safety and health research problem; complete a thorough review of the scholarly literature; formulate hypotheses; collect and appropriately analyze data; and, interpret and report research findings to improve the field of occupational safety and health or to provide solutions to an occupational safety and health problem.
Key: 187