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PHYS 250 : Physics III for Engineers

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Last approved: Wed, 20 Jan 2016 14:21:18 GMT

Last edit: Wed, 20 Jan 2016 14:21:17 GMT

PHYS 250-WW
Campus
Worldwide
College of Arts & Sciences (WARSC)
PHYS
250
Physics III for Engineers
3
This course is a calculus-based study of the fundamental principles of classical mechanics. It is the third course of a three-semester sequence, intended for students of science and engineering and is designed to provide the student with an appropriate background for more advanced physics and engineering course work. Topics of discussion include; electric forces, electric field, Gauss's law, Ohm's law Ampere'slaw, Faraday's law, Lenz's law, Kirchhoff's law and Maxwell's equations; electric potential and electrostatic potential energy; capacitance; simple DC circuit theory; magnetic force, magnetic field; inductance; electromagnetic oscillations and wave propagation; Linear accelerators, cyclotrons.

Physics 250 is a calculus-based study of the fundamental principles of classical mechanics. It is the third course of a three-semester sequence, intended for students of science and engineering and is designed to provide the student with an appropriate background for more advanced physics and engineering course work. Problem solving is central to this goal, and practical applications are introduced where appropriate.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

1. Describe the interaction of static electric charges utilizing the concept of electric field, and compute the electric field produced by simple charge distributions. Use direct integration and Gauss’s Law to compute the electric field.

2. Define electric potential, potential energy, and capacitance. Solve related problems.

3. Analyze simple direct-current circuits, including resistance-capacitance arrangements.

4. Describe the interaction of moving electric charges utilizing the concept of magnetic field. Describe Gauss’ law for magnetism, creation of electric fields from changing magnetic fields (Faraday’s Law) and the creation of magnetic fields from changing electric fields (Amperes’ Law with displacement current). Solve problems involving electromagnetic induction and motional EMF.

5. Define inductance, and analyze the behavior of resistance-inductance and inductance-capacitance circuits.

6. Describe the interplay of oscillating electric and magnetic fields required for propagating electromagnetic waves.

7. Demonstrate an understanding of interference phenomena in the diffraction of light waves in experiments involving single and double slits, circular apertures, diffraction gratings, thin films, and crystals. Solve related problems.

8. Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental concepts of quantum theory, including the Bohr’s model of atom, the Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle, the Schrödinger wave equation and elements of quantum statistics.

9. Demonstrate an understanding of the motivation for postulates of special theory of relativity and solve problems in time dilation and length contraction. Understand and apply the Lorentz transformation equations and their consequences.

Located on the Daytona Beach Campus, the Jack R. Hunt Library is the primary library for all students of the Worldwide Campus. The Chief Academic Officer strongly recommends that every faculty member, where appropriate, require all students in his or her classes to access the Hunt Library or a comparable college-level local library for research. The results of this research can be used for class projects such as research papers, group discussion, or individual presentations. Students should feel comfortable with using the resources of the library. 


Web & Chat: http://huntlibrary.erau.edu
Email:  library@erau.edu
Text: (386) 968-8843
Library Phone:  (386) 226-7656 or (800) 678-9428
Hourshttp://huntlibrary.erau.edu/about/hours.html
 

Written assignments must be formatted in accordance with the current edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) unless otherwise instructed in individual assignments.

ActivityPercent of Grade
Input Grading Item100

Undergraduate Grade Scale

90 - 100% A
80 - 89% B
70 - 79% C
60 - 69% D
0 - 60% F

Graduate Grade Scale

90 - 100% A
80 - 89% B
70 - 79% C
0 - 69% F
Johnelle L. Korioth, Ph.D. - 3/31/2015
korio43b@erau.edu
John H. Bradham, Ph.D., PMP - 3/31/2015
bradhamj@erau.edu
Johnelle L. Korioth, Ph.D. - 3/31/2015
korio43b@erau.edu
Dr. James Schultz – 3/31/2015
schul9fd@erau.edu
Key: 221