Course Outline

UNSY 691 : Graduate Capstone Course

Preview Workflow

Viewing: UNSY 691-WW : Graduate Capstone Course

Last approved: Mon, 11 Jan 2016 19:33:49 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 11 Jan 2016 19:33:48 GMT

UNSY 691-WW
Campus
Worldwide
College of Aeronautics (WAERO)
UNSY
691
Graduate Capstone Course
3
The Master of Science in Unmanned Systems Capstone Course is the culminating effort of the student's entire learning experience. The student will complete a project or comprehensive exam that provides significant evidence of experience in unmanned systems studies. Students will work with designated faculty to formulate, develop, and complete the project or exam. The completion of the Capstone Course is designed to document significant evidence that all Program Outcomes have been met, and provides the student evidence of experience to show to current and prospective employers. The Capstone Course must be taken at the end of the student?s degree program.

The goal of the Graduate Capstone Course is to provide an opportunity for students to demonstrate they have met all Program Outcomes. Students will be given the option of working on an individual or group project or completing an individual comprehensive examination that is aligned with Program Outcomes. Projects and comprehensive examinations will require extensive research, critical thought and statistical analysis that supports the project/examination and Program Outcomes. Students are required to present their project or defend their comprehensive examination, as applicable.

1. Analyze the fundamentals of unmanned systems, including the technological, social, environmental, and political aspects of the system to examine, compare, analyze and recommend conclusions2. Compare and contrast current unmanned system issues, identify contributing factors, and formulate strategies to address or further investigate3. Evaluate and recommend the incorporation of new technologies, methods, processes, or concepts with current unmanned system applications, management practices, or operational policies4. Critically justify and validate unmanned system design configurations to support safe, efficient, and effective operations in applicable domains (air, space, ground, and maritime), including assessing appropriateness of major elemental components; evaluating limitations and constraints; formulating theory of operation; and supporting perceived need5. Effectively communicate concepts, designs, theories, and supporting material with others in the unmanned systems field6. Investigate a current unmanned systems research problem; complete a thorough review of the scholarly literature; formulate hypotheses; collect and appropriately analyze data; and, interpret and report research findings to improve the field of unmanned systems or to provide solutions to an unmanned systems application problem.

Located on the Daytona Beach Campus, the Jack R. Hunt Library is the primary library for all students of the Worldwide Campus. The Chief Academic Officer strongly recommends that every faculty member, where appropriate, require all students in his or her classes to access the Hunt Library or a comparable college-level local library for research. The results of this research can be used for class projects such as research papers, group discussion, or individual presentations. Students should feel comfortable with using the resources of the library. 


Web & Chat: http://huntlibrary.erau.edu
Email:  library@erau.edu
Text: (386) 968-8843
Library Phone:  (386) 226-7656 or (800) 678-9428
Hourshttp://huntlibrary.erau.edu/about/hours.html
 

Davidson, M & McKinney, G. Quantitative reasoning: An Overview. Western Washington University. Retrieved from http://www.ac.wwu.edu/~dialogue/issue8.html#summary Hodson, D. (n. d.). What is scientific literacy and why do we need it? Retrieved from http://www.mun.ca/educ/faculty/mwatch/fall05/hodson.htm Humes, B. (n.d.). Understanding information literacy. Retrieved from http://www.libraryinstruction.com/infolit.html Smith, M. K. (1996). Lifelong learning. Retrieved from http://www.infed.org/lifelonglearning/b-life.htm
N/A

Written assignments must be formatted in accordance with the current edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) unless otherwise instructed in individual assignments.

ActivityPercent of Grade
Input Grading Item100

Undergraduate Grade Scale

90 - 100% A
80 - 89% B
70 - 79% C
60 - 69% D
0 - 60% F

Graduate Grade Scale

90 - 100% A
80 - 89% B
70 - 79% C
0 - 69% F
GUIDELINES: Students register for the UNSY 691 Graduate Capstone Course the same as other courses. The Graduate Capstone Course is ONLY offered through Online and Eagle Vision Home modalities. Campuses will be able to offer this course as needed regardless of the number of students needing the course in any given term. The maximum enrollment in the Graduate Capstone Course is 15 students. In limited cases, faculty may work individually with students. Student registrations may dictate which options are available. Students will complete either the project or the comprehensive examination as a requirement of the course. Student registrations may dictate which options are available. The proposal for the project or comprehensive exam must specifically address how each applicable Program Outcome will be met. The proposal must list each question or a detailed explanation of the project and each member’s role within the project if a group project is selected. Methodology to include what statistical analysis will be conducted must also be included in the proposal. The student’s program specialization(s) must be identified in the proposal. Project Option: The project option, either group or individual, will be determined at the beginning of the term. Project size and structure will be determined by the faculty member. A group project should be 3-5 students per project. Exceptions must be approved by the Department Chair or MSUS Program Chair. The faculty member will guide the development, focus and scope of the project. The project must be comprehensive, relevant, include statistical analysis with a structured methodology and address all applicable Program Outcomes. The project proposal must be submitted to the faculty member and Department for review no later than the end of Week 2. Review and feedback of the proposal by the Department will be accomplished within five (5) working days of receipt. The proposal must: Define the scope and depth of the project to include statistical analysis techniques and research methodologies. Explain how the project will support the student’s attainment of all applicable Program Outcomes. Define the role of each project member. Detail how the final product will be presented. The project must address all core Program Outcomes and applicable Specialization Program Outcomes. Note. Group projects should be of sufficient length, dependent on group size, as to fully develop the project and address all elements of the Program Outcomes. Projects are expected to be no less than 20 pages per individual. Further guidance will be provided by the instructor. The final project is due no later than Week 7. A defense of the project will be conducted no later than Week 8. Each member of the group, if applicable, will contribute to the defense. For the Group Project, a statement of individual performance by each member of the group must be included in the final project, as well as a peer review. After the project has been graded by the instructor, the completed project and grading rubrics will be forwarded to the Department for review. The instructor will provide constructive feedback that includes the grading rubrics and specific comments regarding the project and defense. A rubric is provided to faculty and students for grading the project. In order to provide consistent grading and assessment of outcomes, the rubric should not be changed or modified, unless approved by the Department Chair or MSUS Program Chair. An additional rubric is provided to assess individual students in meeting Program Outcomes. In order to provide consistent grading and assessment of outcomes, the rubric should not be changed or modified, unless approved by the Department Chair or MSUS Program Chair. Comprehensive Examination Option: The comprehensive examination is an individual effort that includes the development of comprehensive examination questions and an in-depth research and statistical analysis effort to answer those questions. The faculty member will guide the student in developing five (5) comprehensive examination questions that suitably address all Core Program Outcomes and applicable Specialization Program Outcomes. The faculty or the Department reviewer has an option to replace two (2), adding two (2) additional questions of their own or from a question pool developed by Department faculty, for a total of five (5) questions to be researched and answered by the student Each of the comprehensive exam questions must be constructed so that the response will demonstrate the student has met one or more of the applicable Program Outcomes. The comprehensive examination questions, in their entirety, will address all core Program Outcomes and applicable Specialization Program Outcomes. The final comprehensive examination questions to be researched and answered must be submitted to the faculty member and Department for review no later than the end of Week 2. Review and feedback of the proposal by the Department will be accomplished within five (5) working days of receipt. The comprehensive examination should be of sufficient length, normally not less than 10 pages per question, as to fully develop each question and address all elements of the applicable Program Outcomes. Further guidance will be provided by the instructor. The completed comprehensive examination is due to the faculty member no later than Week 7. A defense of the exam to the faculty will be conducted no later than Week 8. After the comprehensive examination has been graded by the instructor, the completed exam and grading rubrics will be forwarded to the Department for review. The instructor will provide constructive feedback to the student, which includes the grading rubrics and specific comments regarding the comprehensive examination and defense. A rubric is provided to faculty and students for grading the comprehensive examination. In order to provide consistent grading and assessment of outcomes, the rubric should not be changed or modified, unless approved by the Department Chair or MSUS Program Chair. An additional rubric is provided to assess individual students in meeting Program Outcomes. In order to provide consistent grading and assessment of outcomes, the rubric should not be changed or modified, unless approved by the Department Chair or MSUS Program Chair. The comprehensive examination / project and associated grading rubrics will be forwarded to the Department for review. The purpose of the review is to provide oversight to the overall process, ensuring continuity and consistency. The review will also provide an opportunity to collect assessment data. At the completion of the course, a copy of the comprehensive examination/project and the grading rubrics will be placed in each student’s file for future reference. Students must pass each Program Outcome with a minimum score of 70/100 (based on rubric points). If a Program Outcome does not meet the minimum required score, remediation provided by the instructor must be given until a minimum score is attained. The project / comprehensive examination and the scoring rubrics for all students must be submitted to the owning campus for filing in the student’s records. In the event that remediation was given, the initial and final rubric must be submitted to the campus. Incomplete grades are not offered for the UNSY 691 Graduate Capstone Course. If the project is not completed within the term registered, the faculty member must post an “F” grade or an “IP” (in progress) grade. The “IP” grade requires the students to enroll in UNSY 691C the following term at the cost of one credit hour. If the student does not satisfactorily complete the project by the end of the UNSY 691C term, an “F” grade will be recorded in the original 691 section. Only one UNSY 691C course is available.
Dr. Brent Terwilliger - 4/1/2015
terwillb@erau.edu
Dr. Ian McAndrew - 4/1/2015
mcand4f1@erau.edu
Dr. Kenneth Witcher - 4/1/2015
kenneth.witcher@erau.edu
PO#NameDescription
1-6 Master of Science in Unmanned Systems PO #1 Analyze the fundamentals of unmanned systems, including the technological, social, environmental, and political aspects of the system to examine, compare, analyze and recommend conclusions

PO#2 Compare and contrast current unmanned system issues, identify contributing factors, and formulate strategies to address or further investigate

PO#3 Evaluate and recommend the incorporation of new technologies, methods, processes, or concepts with current unmanned system applications, management practices, or operational policies

PO#4 Critically justify and validate unmanned system design configurations to support safe, efficient, and effective operations in applicable domains (air, space, ground, and maritime), including assessing appropriateness of major elemental components; evaluating limitations and constraints; formulating theory of operation; and supporting perceived need

PO#5 Effectively communicate concepts, designs, theories, and supporting material with others in the unmanned systems field

PO#6 Investigate a current unmanned systems research problem; complete a thorough review of the scholarly literature; formulate hypotheses; collect and appropriately analyze data; and, interpret and report research findings to improve the field of unmanned systems or to provide solutions to an unmanned systems application problem
Key: 280