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ESCI 202 : Solid Mechanics

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Last approved: Mon, 11 Jan 2016 17:26:45 GMT

Last edit: Mon, 11 Jan 2016 17:26:44 GMT

ESCI 202-WW
Campus
Worldwide
College of Aeronautics (WAERO)
ESCI
202
Solid Mechanics
3
The concepts of stress and strain and their tensor properties. Elastic stress strain relations. Analysis of stress and deformation in members subject to axial, torsional, bending and combined loading. Column stability.

This is a fundamental course in engineering used to develop the ability to logically and methodically analyze problems in solid mechanics. Emphasis is placed on understanding the principles employed in problem solutions rather than reliance on substitution and memorization.

1. Develop an understanding of stress, axial loading, torsion, beam bending, pressure in thinwalled cylinders and spheres, stress and strain transformations, and failure theories.2. Employ Large Deflection Beam Theory to address cantilever beam problems associated with axial loading and transverse loading.3. Understand elasticity equations for torsion problems, including non-circular cross sections, elliptical cross sections, and shafts of variable diameter.4. Develop an understanding of plane stress, plane strain, and both the 2-D and 3-D equations of elasticity.5. Analyze 2-D problems in rectangular coordinates (polynomial solutions) for a cantilever beam with an end load or a simply supported beam with a uniform load.6. Solve for deflection of beams with the Double Integration Method as well as the Moment-Area Method.7. Solve 2-D problems in polar coordinates that deal with the elasticity equations, thickwalled pressure vessels, plates with a hole, stress concentrations, point loads on a halfspace, point loads on a wedge (non-prismatic beams), and bending of a curved beam.8. Analyze failures in different classes of columns.

Located on the Daytona Beach Campus, the Jack R. Hunt Library is the primary library for all students of the Worldwide Campus. The Chief Academic Officer strongly recommends that every faculty member, where appropriate, require all students in his or her classes to access the Hunt Library or a comparable college-level local library for research. The results of this research can be used for class projects such as research papers, group discussion, or individual presentations. Students should feel comfortable with using the resources of the library. 


Web & Chat: http://huntlibrary.erau.edu
Email:  library@erau.edu
Text: (386) 968-8843
Library Phone:  (386) 226-7656 or (800) 678-9428
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Students are also required to have a calculator. Graphing calculators are not required (they are quite complicated and expensive), but a basic scientific calculator is necessary (with buttons representing the trigonometric functions of SIN, COS, and TAN; they are typically found starting around $10). Whatever calculator you decide to use, be sure that you know how to use it, as this will alleviate a lot of mistakes and frustration.
N/A

Written assignments must be formatted in accordance with the current edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA) unless otherwise instructed in individual assignments.

ActivityPercent of Grade
Input Grading Item100

Undergraduate Grade Scale

90 - 100% A
80 - 89% B
70 - 79% C
60 - 69% D
0 - 60% F

Graduate Grade Scale

90 - 100% A
80 - 89% B
70 - 79% C
0 - 69% F
Written and oral communication, as well as computer skills are emphasized in each course offered throughout the Worldwide Campus.
Topic 1 (~4 hours): Theoretical Foundation The student will develop an understanding of stress, axial loading, torsion, beam bending, pressure in thin-walled cylinders and spheres, stress/strain transformations, and failure theories. Topic 2 (~5 hours): Axial and Transverse Loading The student will learn to employ Large Deflection Beam Theory to address cantilever beam problems associated with axial loading and transverse loading. Topic 3 (~4 hours): Elasticity Equations The student will learn to understand and use elasticity equations for torsion problems, including non-circular cross sections, elliptical cross sections, and shafts of variable diameter. Topic 4 (~6 hours): Elasticity, Stress, and Strain The student will develop an understanding of plane stress, plane strain, and the 2-D and 3-D equations of elasticity. Topic 5 (~8 hours): End Loads and Uniform Loads The student will learn how analyze 2-D problems in rectangular coordinates (polynomial solutions) for a cantilever beam with end load, or a simply supported beam with a uniform load. Topic 6 (~5 hours): Beam Deflections The student will learn how to solve for deflection of beams with the Double Integration Method as well as the Moment-Area Method. Topic 7 (~4 hours): Polar Coordinates The student will learn how to solve 2-D problems in polar coordinates that deal with the elasticity equations, thick-walled pressure vessels, plates with a hole, stress concentrations, point loads on a half-space, point loads on a wedge (non-prismatic beams), and curved-beam bending. Topic 8 (~4 hours): Failure Modes in Columns The student will learn how to analyze failures in different classes of columns.
Dr. Tim Schoppert - 3/1/2015
schopc4d@erau.edu
Dr. Brian Sanders - 3/1/2015
sanderb7@erau.edu
Dr. Bruce Conway - 3/1/2015
conwaybr@erau.edu
Dr. Kenneth Witcher - 3/1/2015
kenneth.witcher@erau.edu
PO#NameDescription
1-12 AS in Engineering Fundamentals PO #1 - Critical Thinking: The student will apply knowledge at the synthesis level to define and solve problems within professional and personal environments.

PO #2 - Quantitative Reasoning: The student will demonstrate the use of digitally-enabled technology (including concepts, techniques and tools of computing), mathematics proficiency & analysis techniques to interpret data for the purpose of drawing valid conclusions and solving associated.

PO #3 - Information Literacy: The student will conduct meaningful research, including gathering information from primary and secondary sources and incorporating and documenting source material in his or her writing.

PO #4 - Communication: The student will communicate concepts in written, digital and oral forms to present technical and non-technical information.

PO #5 - Scientific Literacy: The student will be able to analyze scientific evidence as it relates to the physical world and its interrelationship with human values and interests.

PO #6 - Cultural Literacy: The student will be able to analyze historical events, cultural artifacts, and philosophical concepts.

PO #7 - Life Long Personal Growth: The student will be able to demonstrate the skills needed to enrich the quality of life through activities which enhance and promote lifetime learning.

PO # 8 Basic Science and Mathematics – The student will demonstrate a knowledge and comprehension of basic physics principles (mechanics, heat, sound, electricity, and optics), and mathematical principles (calculus, differential equations, matrix algebra) and demonstrate the application to engineering concepts.

PO # 9 Engineering Mechanics - Students will demonstrate a knowledge
of the fundamentals of classical engineering mechanics (as applied to rigid, elastic, and fluid media) to provide a foundation for the professional component of the curriculum as well as to become familiar with basic engineering problem-solving techniques, including multidisciplinary approaches.

PO # 10 Experimentation – the student demonstrate an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze, interpret, and discuss data
PO # 11 Design and Analysis Tools – the student will demonstrate an ability to apply modern computer design tools (i.e., CAD) and computational tools to model and analyze engineering designs
PO# 12 Teamwork – the student will demonstrate an ability to function and work cooperatively on multidisciplinary teams
Key: 65