Management Information Systems (MMIS)

Courses

MMIS 501  Business Systems: Managing the IS Enterprise  3 Credits (3,0)

This course provides the foundation for the MSMIS program by reviewing the many ways in which computation, communications and information systems are used to identify and solve problems, recognize opportunities and generate competitive advantage. It uses the concepts of the "enterprise perspective" to demonstrate the various information systems used to lead, manage and operate a variety of organizations. It then uses the "enterprise as system" model to show how all organizations large or small link into the information and knowledge systems of the organizations they interact with -- suppliers, customers, regulators, and their competitors. It also lays the foundations for further examination of key issues, such as information quality and information assurance, throughout the MSMIS program. Throughout, the concept of business processes -- and the engineering and re-engineering of these processes -- provides the unifying focus.

MMIS 502  Managing Mobile & Distributed Organizations and their Information Systems  3 Credits (3,0)

Almost without exception, the modern organization is a mobile and distributed one -- it has people and business processes in many separate locations, interacting with each other to help the organization meet its objectives. In effect, such organizations succeed or fail in large part because their social networks strengthen the organization and help it learn, or get in the way of its core business functions. This course examines the managerial and leadership challenges of these distributed and mobile work places, and how they can and must be coordinated effectively to generate organizational knowledge and awareness to achieve organizational decision making. It then considers how mission needs and organizational objectives, as well as management style and organizational culture, may dictate how tightly, centrally-controlled these decision systems are (or, by contrast, how loosely-coupled, semi-autonomous and cooperative they are). With that foundation established, the course then turns to the opportunities and hazards that "bring your own technology" or BYOT brings to the modern knowledge workers' work places.

MMIS 503  Informatics: Cross-Disciplinary Computing for Competitive Advantage  3 Credits (3,0)

Many industries and markets that heretofore used a traditional MIS perspective are now using the informatics paradigm to gain greater benefit from their information, processing, and communications activities. But what is informatics? Informatics is about structure, behavior and interactions. It's about natural and engineered information and knowledge systems and the way people and organizations use these systems to leverage what they know as they solve problems and create opportunities across a wide variety of activities. Informatics embraces the study and use of both natural and engineered computation and information systems, and how they interact. This course examines the key concepts that make informatics different from "ordinary" information processing, and the kinds of organizations and objectives that can benefit best from an informatics outlook and perspective. Students then explore how to transform organizations to most effectively adopt and use the informatics outlook and the competitive advantages it can bring.

MMIS 504  Knowledge Management: Quality Management for the IS Enterprise  3 Credits (3,0)

Knowledge Management (KM) provides a disciplined approach to recognizing and exploiting the value-added transformation of raw data -- numbers, names, or quantities -- into progressively more useful and more powerful forms of understanding. KM has its roots in a variety of different disciplines. Using the overall framework of Quality Management, and its emphasis on learning organizations, this course provides a comprehensive overview of the field of knowledge management integrating theory, practice, history, issues, terms and a future outlook examining organizational change and organizational learning.

MMIS 505  Information Analytics and Visualization in Decision Making  3 Credits (3,0)

One of the most potent models of the decision process is the OODA Loop -- that we Observe, Orient, Decide, and then Act. Key to this or any other control and decision (or cybernetic) process is that vast quantities of raw sensory data about the outside world must be processed, abstracted, and then presented in contrast and conjunction with the knowledge previously generated and retained. This two-step process -- the reduction, analysis, filtering and abstracting of data into knowledge, and its presentation in formats and fashions that support the decisions that must be made -- is the subject of this course. The relationships between such analysis and visualization will be examined in the context of business and organizational decision-making and decision support systems concepts.

MMIS 506  Systems Analysis and Design  3 Credits (3,0)

Systems analysis and design is the science and art of examining a problem and creating the most effective solution. It is a science in that quantitative analysis, strongly supported by theory and practice, can dictate correct and complete solutions that can be cost-effective. It is also an art, in that organizational culture, prerogatives, and perceptions about value and risk quite often play a major role in how systems design and implementation decisions are made. This course considers systems development methods and analysis and design techniques using a practical rather than technical approach. Learners engage in hands-on learning and work in teams to complete a real-world project using contemporary analysis and design methodologies and tools.

MMIS 507  Information Systems Strategic Planning  3 Credits (3,0)

Strategic planning is the art and science of setting the enterprise's vision and allocating resources to achieve the vision. When formulating information systems strategies, organizations seeks to identify emerging opportunities to leverage new technologies that may add substantial value but also dramatically change the organization. Strategic planning includes choosing which goals and objectives to accomplish, sets criteria for how well they must be accomplished to satisfy other needs, and sets forth the activities to make these "game-changing" events happen effectively and affordably. Many strategic opportunities may present themselves to an organization, or may be discovered by a variety of introspective or business intelligence activities. Making the decision to take advantage of such opportunities is deciding to make strategic change happen. Strategic opportunities may exist because of fundamental changes in technologies, market preferences, government and regulatory actions, and other factors. The strategic planner knows that nothing remains the same, and that while no plan survives contact with reality, the planning process itself provides insight and the opportunity to choose wisely. Strategic planning for information and information systems entails applying the concepts of strategic business planning to the subset of organizational activity that generates, analyzes, maintains, and produces information and knowledge to support strategic decision making. Information systems strategic planning can address, but is not limited to, choices about fundamental information technologies, systems architectures, and information risk mitigation approaches.

MMIS 521  Data Warehousing and Information Quality  3 Credits (3,0)

The term "data warehouse" conveys many different meanings, which this course will examine in some depth. Whether the warehouse provides a historical look back through the organization's transaction histories, or acts as an amalgam of many different data sets, from many different organizations, the key question the organization has to ask is why. Why build a data warehouse? Many different business processes are involved with and affected by the accumulation, extraction (mining), and interpolation of data that might exist between the real data points (data farming). Information quality, as a design discipline and as a management attitude, provides essential emphasis on assuring the right data comes in, to properly-designed and verified correct business decision processes, so that the right decisions can come out of the data warehouse and its operational use. Of all the many attributes and facets of data warehousing, data quality is undoubtedly the utmost significant one. Basically, this is because if the data is wrong, we place our organization at greater risk if we rely on the data warehouse for decision support. Over the past decade, a large number of vendors have saturated the market with several data warehousing products, and it is difficult to evaluate their offerings and help one's organization choose wisely. Students will explore these issues by looking at selected steps in typical data warehousing projects, focusing on organizational objectives and needs, while examining the details of how data warehouses are designed, built, used and maintained. Administration, security, information quality and other key issues will also be placed in this project framework.

MMIS 522  Business Analytics, Social Network and Web Analytics  3 Credits (3,0)

Analytics is the application of techniques to identify important observations and patterns in data. Analytical techniques can be used to overcome the practical challenges presented by data, such as the challenges presented by data volume, variety, velocity, and other properties. This includes application of techniques of data reduction, filtering and analysis in order to identify, measure and assess key business indicators. This course focuses on the business rationale for and application of analytics including exploration of how decision-making processes can and should be driven by the results of well-crafted analytics processes. In particular, the course focuses on both the need for organizations to more fully understand, appreciate and exploit so-called "soft" or "unstructured" data -- the things human beings say to each other, in uncontrolled and unformatted ways, on various social media. Search histories and other "temporary" data, not normally revealed by traditional search engines, will also be examined.

MMIS 523  Data Mining, Machine Learning and Knowledge Discovery  3 Credits (3,0)

Many organizations are familiar with "drilling down" in their data systems to see the details behind a higher-level, more abstract piece of business knowledge -- such as going from "customer complaints have risen 20% this year" to the statistical process control systems' measurements that should have warned us of that before disaster struck! Data mining is both finding the right data in one's file systems or data warehouses, by applying smarter search and filtering criteria, as much as it is the reduction, analysis and presentation of that data in meaningful ways. While many of these techniques are statistical in nature, many rely on applied artificial intelligence algorithms -- so-called "machine learning" -- to help the organization's managers, accountants and lawyers in "discovering" new knowledge in the sea of data that they already have, but cannot digest without significant software help. But data mining and knowledge discovery is not just the domain of "Big Data", as books such as Big Data for the Little Guy, and small business analytics web pages at major big data providers demonstrate. This course surveys these methodologies, and guides the student in identifying the criteria to use to define, manage and operate a successful data mining and machine learning system that meets organizational needs.

MMIS 524  Applied Knowledge Management and Business Intelligence  3 Credits (3,0)

Business intelligence (or BI) is both a process and a product. The product is the timely, precise, high-value and actionable business insights that management needs to make decisions. The process is the gathering, collating, analyzing, and assessing of many different kinds of information that lead to those insights. Business intelligence processes and products can have a profound impact on corporate strategy, performance and competitiveness; and much like intelligence processes and products in the military and national security arenas, BI can have positive or negative impacts upon the organization depending upon how it is done and how it is used (or misused). In that regard, BI is shown to be a focused application of the principles of knowledge management. This course presents students with both the theoretical concepts and practical applications of BI, and examines some aspects of BI successes and failures.

MMIS 531  Information Systems Project Management  3 Credits (3,0)

Managing information technology requires ideas and information that go beyond standard project management. Because the project management field and the technology industry change rapidly, this course provides up-to-date information on how good project management and effective use of software can help you manage projects, especially information technology projects. This course provides an information system orientation for project management. It stresses information systems as a whole, not just software development. The course explains some of the key concerns of project manager as the project develop through the project life cycle.

MMIS 541  Information Risk Management  3 Credits (3,0)

Management information system leaders' responsibility includes structuring the IT and information security functions to defend the organization's information assets, i.e., information and data, hardware, software, processes, networks and people. As the organization grows and develops for IT-based systems to remain viable, information security and the discipline of risk management must become an integral part of the economic basis for making business decisions. These decisions are based on trade-offs between the costs of applying information systems controls and the benefits realized from the operation of secured, available systems. Whether your company is small (<250), medium(>250) or large (>500), organizations must design and create safe environments in which business processes and procedures can function. This course addresses these unique environments and how they must maintain their confidentiality, privacy and assure the integrity of organizational data that are met via the application of the principles of risk management.

MMIS 552  Information Systems and Information Technology Governance  3 Credits (3,0)

Governance is the broad category of policies, plans and procedures that help translate an organization's strategic objectives and plans into the management and control of the people, systems and resources allocated to those plans. Governance is thus strongly linked to organizational compliance with many kinds of government regulations and statutory requirements which aim to control or mitigate risk -- risk to investors, customers, employees and society at large. Two strongly competing governance models bring very different perspectives to this course. The first is data or information governance, which focuses on how the organization does an information or knowledge quality management process. The second is often called information technology governance, even though it focuses on the delivery of information services -- or knowledge work -- to the organization via systems and technologies.

MMIS 553  Change Management and Configuration Control  3 Credits (3,0)

One of the biggest detrimental factors as an organization grows and its niche transforms is resistance by employees ranging from the shop floor to organizational management. Effective communication is also essential for successful change; all stakeholders must be kept informed to keep negativity at bay, and they must share the same view even as that view changes, thus the need for configuration management. This course presents techniques for reducing social and systemic resistance to change, and provides the student with effective tools for accomplishing change management and configuration control. These tools can be applied to small and large systems at any level of an organization, including the organization itself. This course also discusses the distinction between "change leadership", "change management", "configuration management", and "configuration control". Each has a distinct role in managing organizational change, keeping all stakeholders informed, along with establishing and maintaining their positive attitude toward the change. The enterprise uses all of its information systems and technologies to capture and reflect organizational changes.

MMIS 561  Global Information and Technology Management  3 Credits (3,0)

Organizations are using information technology (IT) to transform themselves into global enterprises via key ventures in global e-business, e-commerce and other IT initiatives. IT is a critical component of enterprise success and plays a key role in enterprise globalization, as organizations deploy global IT architectures. The continuous integration of new technologies requires effective management practices to support emerging architectures and organizational objectives.